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SeaVuria Projects Home Page (redirected from SeaVuria Water Project Home Page)

Page history last edited by mariaelizabethbunn@... 1 year, 11 months ago

                                      

 

                                                                                         

water carry

 

 

 

The Water Project :  

In 2012, SeaVuria brought 8 Seattle schools together with 8 schools in Taita Taveta, Kenya to participate in The Water Project, a project that challenges students to investigate global questions such as:
    • “WHY IS WATER SO IMPORTANT?”
    • “WHAT ARE THE MAJOR ISSUES SURROUNDING WATER IN THE WORLD?”
    • “HOW DO WE GET CLEAN WATER?”
    • “WHO HAS THE RIGHT TO CLEAN WATER?”
    • “WHAT CAN I DO TO MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT ON THE WATER ISSUES I LEARN ABOUT?”

 Science teachers from Seattle and Kenya collaborated in March of 2012 to develop lessons that foster student inquiry into these global questions. Together they designed a curriculum that provides students with the underpinnings of scientific knowledge while maintaining common core high school standards. Students in both regions conduct investigations across disciplines to understand social and political issues impacted by water, as well as the natural ecology, science and technology that are fundamental to the availability of clean water. Together, Kenyan and Seattle students are challenged to execute a “Call to Action”, encouraging communities to contribute to clean water campaigns for the good of the future.

 

 

 

 

The Elephant Project: 

In 2000, teachers and staff from the Science Education Partnership (SEP) of Seattle, Washington developed The Elephant Tusk Project as a problem-based curriculum that integrates Internet research, DNA analysis, and bio-ethical issues as students track down the origins of a piece of confiscated ivory. Students discover how modern bio-molecular research tools can help conserve a species, in this case the African elephant. This project offers a menu of options so that teachers can modify the materials and protocols to match their teaching situation.

 

This simulation is designed to give students the experience of performing a DNA restriction digest, analyzing results of a gel electrophoresis, and contributing “new” data to the collection of DNA markers. The simulation includes matching DNA from a piece of confiscated ivory to a known population of elephants, and allows students to explore their own values about species conservation using an ethics module.

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The Diabetes Project: 

Developed in 2014 by The University of Washington’s Genome Sciences Education Outreach (GSEO), The Diabetes Project curriculum fosters student exploration about the genetic and environmental contributions to this challenging disease at a time when an increase in type 2 diabetes nationally and globally gives meaningful context to learning.


In this unit, students learn about the role of glucose in the body, and how the failure of mechanisms that maintain balance result in chronic high blood glucose levels. Students consider genetic factors that contribute to the disease, as well as environmental factors that influence health, including social, political and economic structures. Throughout the unit, prevention and treatment are emphasized as students learn how good nutrition, exercise, personal choice, public health policies and community engagement can contribute to positive health outcomes. As a summative assessment, students create a Call to Action project, in which they implement direct, meaningful, and relevant actions in order to make a contribution towards combating diabetes within their community.

 

 

 

 

The Malaria Project:   

The Malaria Project has been developed to provide secondary teachers with an introductory package of lesson plans about malaria. Malaria is a significant health and development concern facing millions of people — it is the largest cause of child mortality in Africa and its control and prevention are part of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Controlling malaria is a critical key to breaking the cycle of poverty in developing countries. Malaria is increasing largely as a result of environmental degradation and change, but is preventable and treatable.

 

As a critical global issue with relevance in environmental, world studies, and science lessons, malaria deserves some time and attention in the classroom. The purpose of this project is to help students develop an understanding of both the science of malaria infection and the socio-economic impacts the disease has worldwide.

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The Biodiversity Project:

In this collaborative bird-focused project, developed by Rima Givot of Sisters High School and adapted for use in our Kenyan schools, students will learn to ID the most common local birds in their region and in small groups pose questions/hypotheses comparing adaptations of birds in specific habitat types or feeding niches. Through observing and recording data, as well as reading background information and conducting data analysis, students will address the driving question: "What adaptations (morphological, behavioral, physiological) make birds successful in their niche or habitat? How can they coexist and not out-compete other birds/animals?”  The answer to their question/hypothesis and their findings are addressed in a formal presentation.

 

The goal of the project is practice of the scientific method through conducting authentic practical field research and connecting what is learned in the investigation to larger concepts in ecology, genetics, evolution and sustainability.

 

 

 

 

The Antibiotic Resistance Project 

Many people think that a world without antibiotics is a thing of the past, but we are on the cusp of becoming a generation without cures to the simplest bacterial infections. The more often we expose bacteria to antibiotics, the higher the chance of resistance to the drug forming. In today’s society, where any health issue is met with a drug and livestock are being pumped full of antibiotics, more infections are growing resistant to the drugs we use to combat them. Students will investigate the current situation, find solutions to the waning effectiveness of antibiotics, and encourage a behavioral change in society.


In this case study, developed by undergraduate students of the UMass iCONS program, students can choose the topic they wish to study and do original research. Students will then communicate their original conclusions outside the classroom. By creating their own research and having a product leave the classroom, students will be invested in their work and feel like they are contributing to the global conversation about antibiotic resistance.  

 

 

 

The Oil Spill Project 

While the global market is still highly dependent on oil and fossil fuels, society must be aware of the dangers and repercussions of mishandling of this oil. Oil spills are too often forgotten about after the original media rush, and conversations about cleanup methods are neglected. In this case study, we have students to look into the ramifications of an important oil spill, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. We challenge students to look into possible cleanup solutions for oil spills in order to encourage critical thought around an issue that is common in today’s world.   


In this case study, developed by undergraduate students of the UMass Amherst iCons program, students can choose the topic they wish to study and do original research. Students will then communicate their original conclusions outside the classroom. By creating their own research and having a product leave the classroom, students will be invested in their work and feel like they are contributing to the global conversation about oil spills.  

 

 

 

  The Sustainability Project 

In the face of climate change, overflowing landfills, water shortages, and exploitation of natural resources, it is becoming increasingly important to act in responsible and sustainable ways. Environmental sustainability is the intersection of social, economic and environmental solutions to address issues threatening the world we live in. Too often in our society, sustainability is not prioritized and becomes an afterthought. In this case study, we challenge students to explore ways to make our world more sustainable, bringing these important issues into the consciousness of the next generation.


In this case study, developed by undergraduate students of the UMass Amherst iCons program, students can choose the topic they wish to study and do original research. Students will then communicate their original conclusions outside the classroom. By creating their own research and having a product leave the classroom, students will be invested in their work and feel like they are contributing to the global conversation about sustainability. 

 

 

 

  The Ocean Acidification Project 

It is hard to imagine that, as humans, we could significantly change the vast expanses of the open ocean. However, as we release more and more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, it diffuses into the oceans, making them increasingly more acidic. Ocean acidification is often described as the lesser known twin of climate change. A drop in pH could endanger shelled organisms, change fish behavior and have unpredictable consequences on countless other species as well as our own society. Ocean acidification has the potential to cause devastating changes, so it is critical that we all develop more awareness of it.


In this case study, developed by students of the UMass Amherst iCons program, students can choose the topic they wish to study and do original research. Students will then communicate their original conclusions outside the classroom. By creating their own research and having a product leave the classroom, students will be invested in their work and feel like they are contributing to the global conversation about ocean acidification.  

 

 

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User Feedback Form

 

 

SeaVuria Projects are bettered as a result of collaboration. Please, use our Feedback Form generously for any questions and concerns, as well as your thoughts/ideas/feedback that may improve our site and/or projects. We appreciate hearing from you and always strive to respond quickly!

 

                   

 

 

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